May Flowers Bring… Skin Cancer?

By: Elizabeth Meier

Skin Cancer is the most common form of cancer, with approximately 2 million people in the U.S. diagnosed with non-melanoma cancer each year. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported that in 2009, “61,646 people in the United States were diagnosed with melanomas of the skin, including 35,436 men and 26,210 women. 9,199 people in the United States died from melanomas of the skin, including 5,992 men and 3,207 women.”

Deemed Skin Cancer Awareness Month by the CDC, the month of May has brought about days of extreme heat and sun exposure to much of the United States. Although the month is at an end, this does not mean we should ignore the extreme dangers of the sun! Many U.S. states have experienced record-breaking heat waves already this year, and the first day of summer is still nearly a month away!

“Melanoma is the most dangerous and common form of skin cancer. However, melanoma is nearly 100% curable, especially when detected early,” says MaineHealthCancer.org. The importance of awareness and prevention cannot be stressed enough. That is why so many organizations are providing safety information to the public to help lower the skin cancer. Rite Aid Pharmacies are presenting the Road To Healthy Skin Tour, in which they will be performing free skin cancer screenings across America during May – August of 2013. Check out their website for the dates they will be near you, at http://www.skincancer.org/events/tour.

MaineHealthCancer.org urges people to follow the ABC’s of sun safety:
A. Avoid unprotected sun exposure when the sun’s rays are the strongest.
B. Block out the sun by using sunscreen (and re-apply every 2 hours).
C. Cover your body with protective clothing, a hat, and sunglasses.

There are several types, or stages of skin cancer and melanoma cancer. Melanoma cancer is categorized into five (5) stages, from Stage 0 to Stage IV, and Recurrent Melanoma. The recommended treatment depends on the stage of the cancer. If the physician suspects metastatic melanoma (Stage IV), other diagnosis and staging tools may include a blood test for LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) levels or imaging studies such as chest X-ray, CT (computed tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and PET (positron emission tomography) scans, states skincancerabout.com. Cancer.org reports that, “imaging tests may also be done to help determine how well treatment is working or to look for possible signs of cancer recurrence after treatment.”
The use of diagnostic imaging in late stage Melanoma cancer can be expensive, especially when combined with the costs of treatments. Using a patient referral service like MRI Scan Group can help greatly reduced imaging costs. They contract with imaging facilities across the United States to offer extremely discounted self-pay rates to patients. Contact MRI Scan Group today for your imaging needs! Visit their website at http://mriscangroup.com/ or call them at 1-866-674-8840.

Resources:

http://mainehealthcancer.org/Cancer%20Information/Melanoma/Pages/default.aspx

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/prevention/overview/Patient/page3

http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/statistics/

http://skincancer.about.com/od/diagnosis/a/diagnosis.htm

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/skincancer-melanoma/detailedguide/melanoma-skin-cancer-diagnosed

http://mriscangroup.com/

email

Emergence of MRIs in Cancer Detection

Written By Norman McPhail

World Cancer Day passed us by in February with very little recognition. It seems a shame that something as deadly as cancer did not receive more publicity. Everyone has or will be affected by cancer in some way over the course of their life (I know I have). Education is the key to help elevate our awareness of this deadly disease.
Skin Cancer is the most common type of cancer, with well over 1 million cases in the US per year. The good news is that skin cancer is the most treatable with less than 1,000 deaths per year. Interestingly enough, men and women differ quite a bit as far as cancer risk. Men have to worry about prostate cancer, whereas breast cancer is prevalent in women. Lung cancer is equally of concern for both men and women with 210,000 cases per year.
The good news is that cancer survival rates are much better today than just a few years ago. “In 2009, Americans had a 20% lower risk of death from cancer than they did in 1991, a milestone that shows we truly are creating more birthdays,” said John R. Seffrin, PhD, chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society. People are taking matters into their own hands through education by eating better, working out and visiting the doctor more often.
Doctors have many more tools today that can help them detect cancers. X-Rays, CT Scans, Ultrasound, PET and MRIs, among others, are the weapons of choice.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a relatively new technology, having been introduced in 1947. The first human MRI did not occur until 1977. The first MRI equipment to perform exams was developed in the 1980’s. In 2009 there were almost 8 thousand magnets in use around the United States. Today, the MRI is at the forefront of technology and leading the way in reducing the number of deaths from cancer each year.
An MRI uses a combination of a large magnet, radio frequencies and computers that produces detailed images of organs and structures within your body. More importantly, an MRI helps distinguish between normal and diseased tissue to help identify cancer. The MRI provides greater contrast than a CT scan between the different soft tissues of the body.
An MRI is often used to examine the heart, inside bones, brain, liver, pancreas, spine, muscles, male and female reproductive organs, and other soft tissues. It can assess blood flow (contrast), detect tumors and diagnose many forms of cancer, and can help evaluate infections and assess injuries to bones and joints.
MRI Scan Group (MRISG) is a nation-wide referral service for diagnostic imaging, and helps make diagnostic imaging more affordable for the cash paying patients.

MRI Scan Group: http://www.mriscangroup.com
World Cancer Day: http://www.worldcancerday.org