May Flowers Bring… Skin Cancer?

By: Elizabeth Meier

Skin Cancer is the most common form of cancer, with approximately 2 million people in the U.S. diagnosed with non-melanoma cancer each year. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported that in 2009, “61,646 people in the United States were diagnosed with melanomas of the skin, including 35,436 men and 26,210 women. 9,199 people in the United States died from melanomas of the skin, including 5,992 men and 3,207 women.”

Deemed Skin Cancer Awareness Month by the CDC, the month of May has brought about days of extreme heat and sun exposure to much of the United States. Although the month is at an end, this does not mean we should ignore the extreme dangers of the sun! Many U.S. states have experienced record-breaking heat waves already this year, and the first day of summer is still nearly a month away!

“Melanoma is the most dangerous and common form of skin cancer. However, melanoma is nearly 100% curable, especially when detected early,” says MaineHealthCancer.org. The importance of awareness and prevention cannot be stressed enough. That is why so many organizations are providing safety information to the public to help lower the skin cancer. Rite Aid Pharmacies are presenting the Road To Healthy Skin Tour, in which they will be performing free skin cancer screenings across America during May – August of 2013. Check out their website for the dates they will be near you, at http://www.skincancer.org/events/tour.

MaineHealthCancer.org urges people to follow the ABC’s of sun safety:
A. Avoid unprotected sun exposure when the sun’s rays are the strongest.
B. Block out the sun by using sunscreen (and re-apply every 2 hours).
C. Cover your body with protective clothing, a hat, and sunglasses.

There are several types, or stages of skin cancer and melanoma cancer. Melanoma cancer is categorized into five (5) stages, from Stage 0 to Stage IV, and Recurrent Melanoma. The recommended treatment depends on the stage of the cancer. If the physician suspects metastatic melanoma (Stage IV), other diagnosis and staging tools may include a blood test for LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) levels or imaging studies such as chest X-ray, CT (computed tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and PET (positron emission tomography) scans, states skincancerabout.com. Cancer.org reports that, “imaging tests may also be done to help determine how well treatment is working or to look for possible signs of cancer recurrence after treatment.”
The use of diagnostic imaging in late stage Melanoma cancer can be expensive, especially when combined with the costs of treatments. Using a patient referral service like MRI Scan Group can help greatly reduced imaging costs. They contract with imaging facilities across the United States to offer extremely discounted self-pay rates to patients. Contact MRI Scan Group today for your imaging needs! Visit their website at http://mriscangroup.com/ or call them at 1-866-674-8840.

Resources:

http://mainehealthcancer.org/Cancer%20Information/Melanoma/Pages/default.aspx

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/prevention/overview/Patient/page3

http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/statistics/

http://skincancer.about.com/od/diagnosis/a/diagnosis.htm

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/skincancer-melanoma/detailedguide/melanoma-skin-cancer-diagnosed

http://mriscangroup.com/

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YOU BETTER SHOP AROUND… FOR AN MRI!

By Norman McPhail

Being uninsured and needing an MRI in the United States can be an overwhelming experience. The health care/diagnostic imaging business is a tangled web of confusion. Prices for a scan can set you back upwards of $2,000 per scan (Ouch)! The question is: How can you find a competitive priced scan to fit the uninsured budget?

In an emergency, you might not have the option to choose a facility for imaging services. Uninsured diagnostic imaging patients usually don’t need to have the scan done same day and thus have time to shop. The problem is that most people without insurance don’t realize that they CAN shop around. But YOU do! The best way to fight back is to do your homework. Just like when you are buying a car or new TV; shop around! You can search by price or location & scan type. If you do your research right, you could save THOUSANDS of dollars.

Imaging rates are negotiated between insurance companies, physicians, hospitals, and pharmaceutical companies. The negotiated rates are normally shielded and not made available to the public. These shielded rates make it a muddy mess for uninsured patients to research and compare prices. The good news is that negotiated rates only apply to insurance companies. You do have options being uninsured and needing to pay for your health care out of your pocket.

My go-to tool for diagnostic image shopping is the internet! The internet will help you find the imaging services you need, for a price that won’t break the bank. Price comparison websites such as Healthcare Blue Book, New Choice Health and MRI Scan Group can assist you in making an informed decision that won’t break the bank. Affordable imaging is available at your fingertips, so get those piggies moving!

Doctor Delay: Why People Put Off Getting Routine Medical Attention

Written By Elizabeth Meier

There is a growing trend in America recently of patients delaying routine medical checkups and testing. In this day and age, when the keys to good health are literally right at our fingertips, what keeps a large percent of the population from taking the necessary steps to stay updated on their health? Why would we delay important health safeguards, such as routine doctor visits, standard tests and diagnostic imaging?

Cost. Time. Fear. What is the reason that you put off going to the doctor? Do you find yourself delaying routine checkups, or medical tests? Do you make sure your children see their doctor regularly, but you don’t make it a priority for yourself? What is it that makes the average person delay getting routine medical attention?

Cost. In the last few years in the United States, the average job wages have fallen, while the cost of health care has gone up. In an article on this topic in the Huffington Post, Jeffrey Young writes, “A new survey shows more than a one-quarter of Americans had trouble with medical bills in the last year… Costs led 58 percent of people to put off or go without health care they needed in the previous 12 months, a increase from 50 percent last August, says a survey released Monday by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit research organization based in Menlo Park, Calif. Americans skipped doctor and dentist visits, didn’t receive diagnostic tests, didn’t take their medicines, cut pills in half or took other steps to save money that could make them less healthy, the survey found.” Costs for medical procedures and testing, medications and health service have skyrocketed, which has led to an increase in health insurance premiums and/or deductibles. The number of uninsured in America has steadily risen in relation to this epidemic.

Time. Who has the time to go to the doctor? With a daily or weekly schedule that includes work, gym, child pickups, grocery shopping, dinner, and let’s not forget to mention the commuting in between, it is easy to put off or find yourself continuously rescheduling that doctor’s appointment that you feel is not urgent. Jessica Larsen in her La Cosse Tribune article said, “There’s just not enough (time). Between work, school, kids and cleaning, who has time to sit in a clinic waiting room? Moms and caregivers are especially guilty of putting visits off. Even doctors claim the “too busy” card. One doctor admits he sometimes gets behind on going to his eye appointments. ‘Society is so busy. We’re all working 60-hour weeks, have three kids —last thing on anyone’s mind is taking a day off, not get paid, and going to see a doctor,’ he said.”
Fear. Iatrophobia – the fear of going to the doctor. Claustrophobia – the fear of enclosed spaces. Radiophobia – the fear of radiation or X-rays. Mechanophobia – the fear of machines.
Having one or several of these common fears is enough to make you run screaming in the other direction when it comes to going to the doctor, or having medical tests performed. However, the fear of the unknown hopefully wins out in this medical battle royale. It is common to avoid hearing bad news, and most of us expect the worst when it comes to medical tests, but that fear should not stand in the way of having good health confirmed, or a minor worrisome issue taken care of once and for all!

This blog written by staff at MRI Scan Group – a nation-wide referral service for diagnostic imaging. Contact us at 1-866-674-8840, or on our website at http://www.mriscangroup.com/.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/11/health-care-costs_n_1587284.html

http://lacrossetribune.com/news/local/procrastination-has-real-consequences-when-it-comes-to-going-to/article_67afc6bc-dead-11e1-9cbc-001a4bcf887a.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_phobias

Emergence of MRIs in Cancer Detection

Written By Norman McPhail

World Cancer Day passed us by in February with very little recognition. It seems a shame that something as deadly as cancer did not receive more publicity. Everyone has or will be affected by cancer in some way over the course of their life (I know I have). Education is the key to help elevate our awareness of this deadly disease.
Skin Cancer is the most common type of cancer, with well over 1 million cases in the US per year. The good news is that skin cancer is the most treatable with less than 1,000 deaths per year. Interestingly enough, men and women differ quite a bit as far as cancer risk. Men have to worry about prostate cancer, whereas breast cancer is prevalent in women. Lung cancer is equally of concern for both men and women with 210,000 cases per year.
The good news is that cancer survival rates are much better today than just a few years ago. “In 2009, Americans had a 20% lower risk of death from cancer than they did in 1991, a milestone that shows we truly are creating more birthdays,” said John R. Seffrin, PhD, chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society. People are taking matters into their own hands through education by eating better, working out and visiting the doctor more often.
Doctors have many more tools today that can help them detect cancers. X-Rays, CT Scans, Ultrasound, PET and MRIs, among others, are the weapons of choice.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a relatively new technology, having been introduced in 1947. The first human MRI did not occur until 1977. The first MRI equipment to perform exams was developed in the 1980’s. In 2009 there were almost 8 thousand magnets in use around the United States. Today, the MRI is at the forefront of technology and leading the way in reducing the number of deaths from cancer each year.
An MRI uses a combination of a large magnet, radio frequencies and computers that produces detailed images of organs and structures within your body. More importantly, an MRI helps distinguish between normal and diseased tissue to help identify cancer. The MRI provides greater contrast than a CT scan between the different soft tissues of the body.
An MRI is often used to examine the heart, inside bones, brain, liver, pancreas, spine, muscles, male and female reproductive organs, and other soft tissues. It can assess blood flow (contrast), detect tumors and diagnose many forms of cancer, and can help evaluate infections and assess injuries to bones and joints.
MRI Scan Group (MRISG) is a nation-wide referral service for diagnostic imaging, and helps make diagnostic imaging more affordable for the cash paying patients.

MRI Scan Group: http://www.mriscangroup.com
World Cancer Day: http://www.worldcancerday.org